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 The condition of your tyres will have a huge impact on both the performance and the condition of your scooter.

There are three main types of tyres, all of which are physically very similar but which have slightly different characteristics.

Pneumatic: This is the most common type of tyre. It is filled with air and gives the softest ride. It is however prone to punctures and people often have infills (see down page) fitted to alleviate this. There are also puncture proofing fluids available for £15.00 supply only which can be inserted into the inner tube to self seal it in case of a puncture. This is a good economical option for those who want to keep the feel of a pneumatic tyre. It is important to maintain tyre pressures on a pneumatic tyre. Low tyre pressures put extra load on the motor, the gearbox and the batteries as well as making steering more difficult and the ride more erratic. Low tyre pressures will also reduce the life of the tyres themselves. Your scooter manufacturer handbook will give you your exact tyre pressures although typically they are around 30 psi and this is a good rule of thumb in an emergency.

Infill tyre: This tyre is a standard pneumatic tyre that has been filled with a high density foam insert. It rides slightly harder than a pneumatic tyre but still softer than a solid tyre. It has the distinct advantage of being entirely puncture proof. Most scooters can be upgraded to have infill tyres and the cost is usually around £200.00 for all four tyres. feel free to drop us an email and we can give you an exact price for your scooter

Solid Tyre: This is the most basic form of tyre and is often used on small car portable type scooters. It comprises of a wheel centre with a solid rubber tyre outer. Usually with this type of wheel the whole thing has to be replaced once you wear your tyre out.

All tyres wear and it is important to replace them once they are worn to ensure good traction and comfort. All mobility tyres are made from a nylon rubber and eventually this will perish and crack. Needing replacement even if there is still some tread left.

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